Washington: US President Donald Trump on Tuesday fired his National Security Advisor John Bolton, saying he "disagreed strongly" with many of his suggestions.

Announcing Bolton's sacking on twitter, Trump said he will name a new national security advisor next week.

Appointed in April 2018, Bolton is the third national security adviser to leave Trump's side, following in the footsteps of Michael Flynn and H R McMaster.

"I informed John Bolton last night that his services are no longer needed at the White House. I disagreed strongly with many of his suggestions, as did others in the Administration, and therefore.... I asked John for his resignation, which was given to me this morning," Trump tweeted.

"I thank John very much for his service. I will be naming a new National Security Advisor next week," he added.

The tweet came just one hour after the White House press office said Bolton was scheduled to appear at a Tuesday press briefing alongside Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin.

Minutes after Trump tweeted, Bolton came out with his own response, contradicting the president's version of events. "I offered to resign last night and President Trump said, 'Let's talk about it tomorrow'," Bolton tweeted.

A leading foreign policy hawk, Bolton was widely known to have pressed Trump for a harder line on North Korea and Iran. He had also advocated a tougher approach on Russia and Afghanistan.

A disagreement between Trump and Bolton over the president's decision to host a now-cancelled meeting with leaders of the Taliban at Camp David reportedly appeared to be the last straw.

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New Delhi: Raghu Karnad, The Wire‘s consulting editor and former bureau chief, on Thursday received the Windham-Campbell prize at Yale University in the US for his book Farthest Field: An Indian Story of the Second World War.

On receiving the prize, Karnad said he wrote the book without any certainty that it would even find a publisher outside of India. “To have it recognized like this—and placed in the company of others that were my inspirations—feels less like an achievement than a fantastical dream,” he said. He received the non-fiction category prize for “combining forensic archival research with imaginative fire and unsettling national and colonial histories” in his book.

The book narrates a lost chapter in Indian history through the lives of five young people and was the end result of an essay written in 2012 on the living traces of the Second World War in India’s northeast.

He received also received the prize money of $165,000 at the official ceremony held at the Yale University Art Gallery from the university’s president Peter Salovey.

courtesy: thewire.in