New Delhi, July 13: Most three-years-old may find it difficult to even form a sentence, but not child prodigy Chryseis Knight who holds the rare distinction of being one of the youngest authors in the world.

"The Great Big Lion", drawn and written by child prodigy Knight, is a story about lion and two children. It talks about friendship, inclusivity, wildlife conservation and the world of imagination.

Earlier published independently abroad, the book was released on Monday for the first time in India under Penguin Random House India's 'Puffin' imprint.

Knight, who is currently residing in Canada, learnt how to read at the age of one, started writing the story of "The Great Big Lion" in her notebook when she was three years old. She then shared it with her family and became determined to do the artwork with the motivation of getting the book published.

Now seven-years-old, she hopes to inspire children all around the world to embrace the magic in books.

"Tremendously excited that we are publishing this unique book that was written and illustrated by Chryseis when she was merely three! Her writings have an endearing quality; it speaks to children and resonates with them, and the themes she covers are wide-ranging: from wildlife conservation to developing empathy. It is not surprising that she was inducted into Mensa at age two for her linguistic talents. She's exceptionally gifted and we look forward to her writing career as she grows up," said Arpita Nath, commissioning editor, Penguin Random House.

The book is available for sale on online and offline stores.

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Hong Kong, Oct 25: Amnesty International said Monday it would close its two offices in Hong Kong this year, becoming the latest non-governmental organization to cease its operations amid a crackdown on political dissent in the city.

The human rights group said its local office in Hong Kong would close this month while its regional office will close by the end of the year, with regional operations moved to other offices in the Asia-Pacific region.

This decision, made with a heavy heart, has been driven by Hong Kong's national security law, which has made it effectively impossible for human rights organizations in Hong Kong to work freely and without fear of serious reprisals from the government, Anjhula Mya Singh Bais, chair of Amnesty's board, said in a statement.

Hong Kong implemented a sweeping national security law in 2020 following months of massive anti-government protests. The law outlaws secession, subversion of state power, terrorism and foreign collusion to intervene in the city's affairs. More than 120 people, many of them supporters of the city's democracy movement, have been arrested under the law.

The majority of the city's prominent pro-democracy activists are behind bars for taking part in unauthorized assemblies, and dozens of political organizations and trade unions have ceased operations out of concern for their members' personal safety under the security law.

Bais said the recent targeting of local human rights and trade union groups signaled authorities were intensifying their campaign to rid the city of dissenting voices. It is increasingly difficult for us to keep operating in such an unstable environment, she said.

Critics in Hong Kong say the national security law is an erosion of freedoms, such as those of expression and assembly, that were promised the city for 50 years when the former British colony was handed over to China in 1997.