Kanpur, Nov 25: India were 258 for four at stumps on the opening day of the first Test against New Zealand here on Thursday.

Shreyas Iyer was batting on 75 while Ravindra Jadeja was unbeaten on 50 at stumps.

Electing to bat, Gill and Cheteshwar Pujara shared 61 runs after the fall of Mayank Agarwal (13) early.

India lost three wickets in the afternoon session before debutant Iyer and Jadeja added an unfinished 113 runs to take India across the 250-mark.

Kyle Jamieson (3/47) troubled the Indian batters, scalping three wickets, while his pace colleague Tim Southee (1/43) took one wicket.

Brief Scores:

India 1st innings: 258 for 4 in 84 overs (Shubman Gill 52, Shreyas Iyer 75 not out; Kyle Jamieson 3/47).

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Moscow, Dec 4: About 2,500 seals have been found dead on the Caspian Sea coast in southern Russia, officials said Sunday.

Authorities in the Russian province of Dagestan said it was unclear why the mass die-off happened but that it was likely due to natural causes.

Regional officials initially reported Saturday that 700 dead seals were found on the coast, but the Dagestan division of the Russian Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment later raised the figure to about 2,500.

Zaur Gapizov, head of the Caspian Environmental Protection Center, said in a statement that the seals likely died a couple of weeks ago. He added that there was no sign that they were killed or caught in fishing nets.

Experts of the Federal Fisheries Agency and prosecutors inspected the coastline and collected data for laboratory research, which didn't immediately spot any pollutants.

Several previous incidents of mass seal deaths were attributed to natural causes. Kazakhstan, which has a long Caspian coastline, reported at least three such incidents this year.

Data about the number of seals in the Caspian vary widely. The fisheries agency has said the overall number of Caspian seals is 270,000-300,000, while the Caspian Environmental Protection Center put the number at 70,000.