Paris, Sep 27: French President Emmanuel Macron was hit at the shoulder Monday by an egg thrown at him by a man during a visit to an international food trade fair in the French city of Lyon.

A video of the incident, widely shared on the social media, shows Macron walking through the crowd when an egg bounced off him without breaking. Two bodyguards can be seen immediately getting closer to the president to protect his shoulders.

The video also shows a man being taken away from the scene by other bodyguards.

Reporters at the scene heard Macron saying If he has something to tell me, then he can come.

No details have been released by authorities on the identity or the motivations of the man.

In June, Macron was slapped in the face by a man as he was greeting the public in a small town in southeastern France. He then denounced violence and stupidity.

The slap prompted a wide show of support for France's head of state from politicians across the ideological spectrum.

Macron, like his predecessors, enjoys spending time in meet-and-greets with members of the public. Called crowd baths in French, they have long been a staple of French politics.

A little over six months before France's next presidential election, Macron, 43, has not yet announced his reelection bid but is expected to do so.

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Hong Kong, Oct 25: Amnesty International said Monday it would close its two offices in Hong Kong this year, becoming the latest non-governmental organization to cease its operations amid a crackdown on political dissent in the city.

The human rights group said its local office in Hong Kong would close this month while its regional office will close by the end of the year, with regional operations moved to other offices in the Asia-Pacific region.

This decision, made with a heavy heart, has been driven by Hong Kong's national security law, which has made it effectively impossible for human rights organizations in Hong Kong to work freely and without fear of serious reprisals from the government, Anjhula Mya Singh Bais, chair of Amnesty's board, said in a statement.

Hong Kong implemented a sweeping national security law in 2020 following months of massive anti-government protests. The law outlaws secession, subversion of state power, terrorism and foreign collusion to intervene in the city's affairs. More than 120 people, many of them supporters of the city's democracy movement, have been arrested under the law.

The majority of the city's prominent pro-democracy activists are behind bars for taking part in unauthorized assemblies, and dozens of political organizations and trade unions have ceased operations out of concern for their members' personal safety under the security law.

Bais said the recent targeting of local human rights and trade union groups signaled authorities were intensifying their campaign to rid the city of dissenting voices. It is increasingly difficult for us to keep operating in such an unstable environment, she said.

Critics in Hong Kong say the national security law is an erosion of freedoms, such as those of expression and assembly, that were promised the city for 50 years when the former British colony was handed over to China in 1997.